Mystery Play Internet Radio

Old Time Radio Lives Here!

Mystery Play Internet Radio has been broadcasting old time radio on the internet for over 15 years. MPIR has evolved from simple playlists of mp3 formatted radio plays to sophisticated live stream programming to net casting on various listening devices. Clyde J. Kell the owner and operator of Mystery Play Internet Radio has only one purpose and passion. To enable as many people as possible from all over the world the ability to listen and share old time radio.

 

Main Stream Updated

Here's some tidbits and information about what's playing on the main stream this week.

Dimension X was first heard on NBC April 8, 1950, and ran until September 29, 1951. Fine isolated science fiction stories were developed on the great anthology shows, Suspense and Escape. But until the premiere of Dimension X -- a full two decades after network radio was established -- there were no major science fiction series of broad appeal to adults. This show dramatized the work of such young writers as Ray Bradbury, Robert (Psycho) Bloch, Robert Heinlein, Isaac Asimov, and Kurt Vonnegut. In-house script writer was Ernest Kinoy, who adapted the master works and contributed occasional storied of his own.
 

The Shadow aired from 1930 through 1954.  "Who knows what evil lurks in the hearts of men? The Shadow knows!" The opening lines captivated listeners and are instantly recognizable even today. Originally the narrator of the series of macabre tales, the eerie voice known as The Shadow became so popular to listeners the narrator became the star of the old-time mystery radio series. The program, loosely adapted from the popular pulp magazine series, told the story of Lamont Cranston, a wealthy young man-about-town who used his hypnotic powers to cloud men's minds so that they could not see him, fighting crime as an Invisible Avenger known only as The Shadow.

The Key was a mystery series from Australia that aired in the mid 1950's. Not much is known about the series. There  was an ad in the ABC Weekly 11 Dec 1957 and it named the scriptwriter as James Workman who is known as a pulp writer.

 

Portions of the above text taken from internet resources.